Centrum
jazykového vzdělávání MU

Konference Výuka ekonomického jazyka na vysokých školách

Supporting autonomous language learning in teaching LSP – the teachers’ perspective

 
Reka Azstalos
 

Réka Asztalos, lecturer, Language Department, Budapest Business School, Faculty of Commerce, Hospitality and Tourism. Réka Asztalos teaches English for Tourism and Hospitality, and English for Business Purposes at Budapest Business School, University of Applied Sciences. She holds a PhD in English language pedagogy focusing on the pedagogical purposes of using ICT tools in higher education. Her research interests include autonomous learning and how to enhance students’ ability and willingness to study independently, including informal learning. She has presented on these topics regularly at conferences and also published in academic journals. Alexandra Szénich, lecturer, Language Department, Budapest Business School, Faculty of Commerce, Hospitality and Tourism Alexandra Szénich teaches German for Tourism and Hospitality, and German for Business Purposes at Budapest Business School, University of Applied Sciences. She holds a PhD in language testing specialized in secondary school final exams. She has been coordinating a research project on autonomous learning including the four faculties of the university starting in September 2017. She is a regular conference presenter, and an author of academic publications on these topics.

Our research is the second part of a research project carried out at the Institute of Foreign Languages and Communication at the Budapest Business School, University of Applied Sciences in 2017-18. While the first phase focused on LSP students, the second phase aimed at investigating LSP teachers’ disposition towards autonomous language learning in higher education, as well as their experience and practices supporting students’ autonomous language learning. Interviews were conducted with ten LSP teachers (including English, German, Spanish, French and Italian teachers) from the four faculties of the university in May 2018. The interviews focused on the following topics: the respondents’ teaching experience, their disposition towards autonomous language learning, the teacher’s role in enhancing learner autonomy, ways to support the autonomous learning of LSP at university, students’ disposition towards autonomous language learning and the future of teaching LSP. Findings suggest that the majority of teachers consider autonomous language learning important but they also question its feasibility in teaching LSP in higher education for several reasons, which include students’ lack of motivation, the big sizes of groups and the pressure to prepare students for B2 level LSP exams. Based on the results of the two phases of our research, our aim is to develop tools and methods for LSP teachers to support autonomous learning.

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